The Holy Trinity Column, one of the city’s few baroque monuments, is better known as the Plague Column. It was built in thanks for averting the plague epidemic, which passed by Teplice in 1713. Today we know that even the plague was afraid of entering Teplice, because it was simply too pretty and too healthy.

It was designed by the celebrated sculptor and carver Matthias Bernard Braun, who was heavily influenced by Italian art. The Holy Trinity Column is his tallest work. If you stand under it and try to take a picture, you can’t get it all in your frame, just like the Eiffel Tower.

The highly detailed contract that Count Franz Karl von Clary-Aldringen signed with Matthias Braun is also worth mentioning. Not only does it specify the height of the column at 32 ells, the number of steps, whole angels or just their heads, but also the source of the stone or, to be more precise, the use of the stone quarry in Nelahozeves, which could not be used for the production of any other work at that time. The contract even specified the number of wagons for the transportation of craftsmen. If we were to dedicate the same detailed preparation of construction projects these days, it would take 200 years to build a motorway. But, now that you mention it…